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Robbie Shone Engagement Rate: 1.08%

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

#ThrowbackThursday - Over 20 years ago, I took up caving and for many years I was obsessed by this cave! This is a slide (Fuji Sensia 400) that I shot from back in the day on my trusty Nikon FM2 SLR camera. It shows the view looking up the larger half of Titan shaft, inside a cave known for centuries as The Devils Arse, aka Peak Cavern, England. Carved out by water, these limestone cliffs measure 141.5 metres (464 ft) high, making Titan the biggest cave in the UK. It is even tall enough to swallow the London Eye. We spent years digging a shaft from the surface into Titan to create a ‘back door’ into the mighty Peak/Speedwell Cavern system. Titan offered me a playground, where I could practice extreme cave photography and I loved it! There is something quite magical about photographing caves on film that I’ve not experienced since switching to digital back in 2004. #FilmPhotography #CavePhotography #AnalogPhotography #Film #Cave #Explore #Exploration #Explorer #Derbyshire #PeakDistrict #InternationalYearOfCavesAndKarst #PeakCavern #Titan

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

2021 is the International Year of Caves and Karst. Cavers, researchers and those who appreciate the underground will be promoting the beauty, the wonder and the life beneath our feet. As you all know, this is my world, a place where I truly feel at one. For my little contribution to this campaign, I’ll make one post per month from a spectacular underground place or caving region. This months picture shows the stunning Cloud Chamber in Dan yr Ogof, South Wales. Taking this picture was especially tricky as we had to be very careful not to damage any of the delicate “soda straws” hanging from the ceiling. Such formations are the first stages in forming a stalactite. As their name suggests, they are hollow in the middle. Over longer periods of time, these will eventually become blocked and start thickening up on the outside and form a stalactite. #InternationalYearofCavesandKarst #cave #speleology #DanYrOgof

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

#EndOfTheIceCaves - This is why I am shooting this story now. The alpine ice caves are melting due to climate change. Here, you see a beautiful artistic impression showing Kolowratshöhle in the 19th century [artist: Georg Petzoldt 1810-1878]. The second image, taken by me today shows the same cave from the same location as it is now. The ice is all but gone apart from a dirty puddle in the bottom of the photograph. This will be the fate of the others in the next decades. @natgeointhefield @natgeo

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

The loss of the ice caves is not just about losing a beautiful underground landscape, but also about losing an important scientific resource. Like tree rings that can be analysed for climate information, the layers within the ice can also provide climate information. The nature of their formation means the records reveal details of past winter seasons. Organic material trapped within the ice can be radiocarbon dated to find out when the ice was deposited. #EndOfTheIceCaves #IceCaves @NatGeo @Natgeointhefield

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

It’s quite simply a race against time to document the beautiful European ice caves before they melt away and disappear due to climate change. We have just returned from Hochschneid ice cave, located in the Höllengebirge, Austria. Here, climate scientist Tanguy Racine from the University of Innsbruck, admires the pristine ice at the bottom of the cave. To the right, is ice that formed when water entered the cave and froze. To the left, behind Tanguy, is ice formed from snow that fell into the cave from the entrance, creating a snow cone. #EndOfTheIceCaves #IceCaves @natgeointhefield @natgeo @uniinnsbruck

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

The birth of Art - the dawn of a new day. Sunrise view overlooking forested landscape above Steinkirche and Scharzfeld. This site lies very close to that of Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave). Last week researchers announced the discovery of the first directly-dated piece of Neanderthal art: A distinctly-carved bone from a now extinct giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus). It was excavated from sediments that blocked an ancient entrance to Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave) in Germany’s Harz Mountains. Most Important to researchers, the bone featured a deliberate engraving in the form of a chevron, indicating that Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking—and what some researchers believe is “art.”. These findings were recently published in the journal Nature Evolution & Ecology. This photograph concludes my portfolio from this fascinating and exclusive story about the discovery a small seemingly insignificant bone that indicates Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking. Follow link in my bio to read the full and exclusive story written by Andrew Curry (@spoke32) on Nat Geo. @natgeo @natgeointhefield #Unicorncave #einhornhöhle #archeology #neanderthal

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

At the University of Göttingen, Germany, we met Dr. Raphael Hermann, who is a research assistant in the ERC project WEIGHTANDVALUE, but also was responsible for carrying out the experiment to better understand how 50,000 years ago, Neanderthals could carve so precisely the engravings onto a giant deer bone.  He learnt that the bone must have been boiled for at least 2-hours before being carved with a stone flint of some kind. He made his experiment outside because the smell was too intense. Last week, researchers announced the discovery of the first directly-dated piece of Neanderthal art: A distinctly-carved bone from a now extinct giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus). It was excavated from sediments that blocked an ancient entrance to Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave) in Germany’s Harz Mountains. Most Important to researchers, the bone featured a deliberate engraving in the form of a chevron, indicating that Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking—and what some researchers believe is “art.”These findings were recently published in the journal Nature Evolution & Ecology. Tomorrow I’ll conclude this fascinating and exclusive story about the discovery a small seemingly insignificant bone that indicates Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking. Follow link in my bio to read the full and exclusive story written by Andrew Curry (@spoke32) on Nat Geo. @natgeo @natgeointhefield #Unicorncave #einhornhöhle #archeology #neanderthal

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

Overlooking the archaeological dig outside Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave), the giant deer bone (Megaloceros giganteus) with the Neanderthal engravings is in safe hands. Last week, researchers announced the discovery of the first directly-dated piece of Neanderthal art: A distinctly-carved bone from a now extinct giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus). It was excavated from sediments that blocked an ancient entrance to Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave) in Germany’s Harz Mountains. Most Important to researchers, the bone featured a deliberate engraving in the form of a chevron, indicating that Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking—and what some researchers believe is “art.”. These findings were recently published in the journal Nature Evolution & Ecology. Over the next few days, I’ll begin to conclude this fascinating and exclusive story about the discovery a small seemingly insignificant bone that indicates Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking. Follow link in my bio to read the full and exclusive story written by Andrew Curry (@spoke32) on Nat Geo. @natgeo @natgeointhefield #Unicorncave #einhornhöhle #archeology #neanderthal

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

Lead archaeologists Thomas Terberger of the University of Göttingen and Dirk Leder of the Lower Saxony State Office for Cultural Heritage, direct excavations at Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave). Last week these researchers and their team announced the discovery of the first directly-dated piece of Neanderthal art: A distinctly-carved bone from a now extinct giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus). It was excavated from sediments that blocked an ancient entrance to Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave) in Germany’s Harz Mountains. Most Important to researchers, the bone featured a deliberate engraving in the form of a chevron, indicating that Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking—and what some researchers believe is “art.”. These findings were recently published in the journal Nature Evolution & Ecology. Over the next week, I’ll post a photograph a day from this fascinating and exclusive story about the discovery a small seemingly insignificant bone that indicates Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking. Follow link in my bio to read the full and exclusive story written by Andrew Curry (@spoke32) on Nat Geo. @natgeo @natgeointhefield #Unicorncave #einhornhöhle #archeology #neanderthal

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

Up against the wall and buried in the infill blocking the original cave entrance to Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave), MSc student Gabriele Russo from the University of Tuebingen in Germany, discovers the Megaloceros bone containing the engravings. Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave) in the Harz Mountains, Lower Saxony, Germany, has been an important archaeological site for a number of decades. Situated today in lush green, tranquil, rolling hills, this small cave was once home to Neanderthals. Recently, a bone from the now extinct giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus) was excavated from sediments that blocked a previous entrance. Importantly, the bone contained engravings in the form of a chevron (i.e. not random) indicating that Neanderthals had the capacity for abstract thinking.  These findings were recently published in the journal Nature Evolution & Ecology Today, researchers announced the discovery of the first directly-dated piece of Neanderthal art: A distinctly-carved bone from a now extinct giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus). It was excavated from sediments that blocked an ancient entrance to Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave) in Germany’s Harz Mountains. Most Important to researchers, the bone featured a deliberate engraving in the form of a chevron, indicating that Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking—and what some researchers believe is “art.”. These findings were recently published in the journal Nature Evolution & Ecology. Over the next week, I’ll post a photograph a day from this fascinating and exclusive story about the discovery a small seemingly insignificant bone that indicates Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking. Follow link in my bio to read the full and exclusive story written by Andrew Curry (@spoke32) on Nat Geo. @natgeo @natgeointhefield #Unicorncave #einhornhöhle #archeology #neanderthal

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

Here we see the outside archaeological dig at Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave). This excavation lies directly above the main underground dig and is only separated by a few feet of sediment fill. Before the mined tunnel into the cave and the skylight entrance, it is believed that this was the only way into cave. Last week, researchers announced the discovery of the first directly-dated piece of Neanderthal art: A distinctly-carved bone from a now extinct giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus). It was excavated from sediments that blocked an ancient entrance to Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave) in Germany’s Harz Mountains. Most Important to researchers, the bone featured a deliberate engraving in the form of a chevron, indicating that Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking—and what some researchers believe is “art.”. These findings were recently published in the journal Nature Evolution & Ecology. Over the next week, I’ll post a photograph a day from this fascinating and exclusive story about the discovery a small seemingly insignificant bone that indicates Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking. Follow link in my bio to read the full and exclusive story written by Andrew Curry (@spoke32) on Nat Geo. @natgeo @natgeointhefield #Unicorncave #einhornhöhle #archeology #neanderthal

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Robbie Shone Instagram
shonephoto Instagram

Here, we see students from the University of Regensburg and the University Bochum, Germany, work with piles of tiny stones from the main underground dig. They examine the finds for archaeological artifacts. Last week, researchers announced the discovery of the first directly-dated piece of Neanderthal art: A distinctly-carved bone from a now extinct giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus). It was excavated from sediments that blocked an ancient entrance to Einhornhöhle (Unicorn Cave) in Germany’s Harz Mountains. Most Important to researchers, the bone featured a deliberate engraving in the form of a chevron, indicating that Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking—and what some researchers believe is “art.”. These findings were recently published in the journal Nature Evolution & Ecology. Over the next week or so, I’ll post a photograph a day from this fascinating and exclusive story about the discovery a small seemingly insignificant bone that indicates Neanderthals had the capacity for symbolic thinking. Follow link in my bio to read the full and exclusive story written by Andrew Curry (@spoke32) on Nat Geo. @natgeo @natgeointhefield #Unicorncave #einhornhöhle #archeology #neanderthal

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FAQ - shonephoto Instagram Account Stats

Here are some of the frequently asked questions about Robbie Shone Instagram Account.

Answer: shonephoto Instagram account has 303.9K followers.
Answer: Engagement rate of shonephoto Instagram is 1.08%
Answer: Average likes are about 3.3K per post.
Answer: Average comments are about 20.5 per post.
Answer: Official Robbie Shone username Instagram is @shonephoto