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Financial Times Engagement Rate: 0.32%

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8.1K

Avg. Comments

229.17

Avg. Engagement

0.32%

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

Yes, the FT does recipes too. Click the link in our bio or head over to @ft_weekend for the full recipes and let us know how your desserts turn out.

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

When Simone Biles withdrew from the women’s team event earlier this week, the world’s greatest gymnast demonstrated that the heaviest burden of the Olympics is often the expectation to perform in them.⁠ ⁠ Biles said she was not in the right frame of mind to perform the dangerous tumbling feats for which she is famous, and subsequently decided to pull out of the individual all-around final.⁠ ⁠ In the process, she has renewed a global conversation about mental health.⁠ ⁠ The staging of the Tokyo Olympics during the pandemic — and all of its associated restrictions — has exacerbated the pressures of performance.⁠ ⁠ Biles said disharmony between her body and brain was the specific reason she pulled out of the competition, saying she experienced a phenomenon gymnasts refer to as 'the twisties'.⁠ ⁠ 'You have to be there 100% or 120% because if you’re not the slightest bit, you can get hurt. Even on my vault I had no idea where I was in the air,' she said. ⁠ ⁠ Tap the link in our bio to read more about the pressure on elite athletes during the pandemic.

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

Since Momiji Nshiya, a 13-year-old Japanese schoolgirl, won a gold medal in skateboarding, a debate about what to do with the sports park built for the Games has opened up. Now Japan is facing one of the hardest-fought contests of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics: a post-games bidding war between the country’s biggest property developers. Japan won two gold medals in skateboarding’s debut as an Olympic sport in the Street event and is a serious contender in the Park discipline competition next week.   Victories in both the men’s and women’s events have also forced the country into an uneasy truce with a pursuit that is formally banned in most of the country’s parks and public spaces. This includes the areas just outside the Olympic skateboard venue itself and, in a rule generally ignored after dark, in the streets around the National Stadium.  The country’s top skateboarders mostly live and train in the US, while many skateboarders in Japan complain that their passion is pursued under the permanent threat of stoppage by security guards and police. Click the link in our bio to read more about whether the Olympic skatepark will survive.  📷: 1: Rayssa Leal by Lionel Bonaventure / AFP via Getty Images 2. Momiji Nshiya by Ezra Shaw/ Getty Images 3. Skateboarder by Carl Court/ Getty Images 4. Pamela Rosa by Jeff Pachoud/AFP via Getty Images 5. Medal ceremony for the men's street prelims by Jeff Pachoud/AFP via Getty Images 6. Medal ceremony for the skateboarding women's street final by Jeff Pachoud/AFP via Getty Images #FT #financialtimes #olympics2020 #olympics #skateboarding #momijiNshiya #rayssaleyal #japan #sport

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

Robinhood officially debuted on the Nasdaq — and its shares fell sharply. ⁠ ⁠ Opening at $38 apiece, which matched the price the company had agreed to sell its shares at a day earlier, the stock soon whipsawed, dropping as much as 12% to $33.35 at midday in New York, before recovering slightly to close the session 8.4% lower at $34.82. ⁠ ⁠ The fall compared to a 39 per cent first-day jump in the shares of the average US IPO this year, according to Dealogic data.⁠ ⁠ Robinhood ranked among the most actively traded US stocks on Thursday, surpassing the likes of Apple and Tesla by number of shares traded.⁠ ⁠ While the hottest tech initial public offerings often price above expectations, Robinhood’s value indicated that investor appetite — particularly from big money managers that can make or break an IPO — was not insatiable for the brokerage’s stock.⁠ ⁠ The settling trade of $34.82 gave Robinhood a valuation of $29bn, putting it in the orbit of other large brokers like ETrade.⁠ ⁠ Tap the link in our bio to read our full coverage.

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

Despite a rise in global vaccinations, Covid-19 cases are surging. Should we be worried?⁠ ⁠ Vaccines reduce the probability of getting seriously ill from Covid-19, yet people can still get it. ⁠ ⁠ While anecdotal accounts of breakthrough infections can make such cases feel widespread, the real numbers have remained small and were generally in line with expectations, experts said.⁠ ⁠ 'There’s no such thing as a perfect vaccine . . . with Covid it’s no different,' said Professor William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University.⁠ ⁠ When fully vaccinated people get Covid-19, the effects are milder.⁠ ⁠ A Financial Times analysis of global infection fatality rates suggests that a double-jabbed 80-year-old person now faces about the same mortality risk as an unvaccinated 50-year-old.⁠ ⁠ According to PHE’s real-world studies, the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine is still 96% effective against hospital admission, while the Oxford/AstraZeneca shot is 92% effective.⁠ ⁠ Tap on the link in the bio to find out more about vaccines and Covid-19. ⁠ ⁠ #financialtimes #ft #datavisualisation #covid #deltavariant⁠ ⁠

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

Apple, Alphabet and Microsoft brought in combined after-tax profits of almost $5bn a week during the latest quarter.  At $56.8bn, the total was almost double the year before and 30% more than Wall Street had predicted. The figures were 'absolutely stunning', said Jim Tierney, a portfolio manager, adding that 'digital advertising is just on fire'. The quarterly numbers revealed an across-the-board boom in digital demand from consumers and business customers:  📱Sales of Apple's iPhones jumped 50% 💰Google's advertising sales soared 69%  ☁️Growth at Microsoft's Azure cloud platform re-accelerated to more than 50% In total, the three tech companies generated $189.4bn in revenue, 39% more than the same period the year before.  Tap the link in our bio for more.

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

Fully vaccinated visitors from the US and EU will be allowed to enter England without having to quarantine, but will still have to take a pre-departure test followed by a PCR test after they have arrived, the UK transport secretary has confirmed.⁠ ⁠ Whitehall officials said UK ministers, led by chancellor Rishi Sunak, had argued it was safe to start readmitting foreign tourists without the need for quarantine if they had received two jabs. ⁠ ⁠ The move will bring relief to the country’s leisure sector, as Sunak was particularly concerned that tourist destinations such as London would lose out to locations such as Paris and Rome now that the EU had decided to admit US visitors. ⁠ ⁠ Click the link in our bio to read more on how the reopening of the borders will work. ⁠ ⁠ 📷: Daniel Leal-Olivas / AFP via Getty⁠ ⁠ #FT #financialtimes #travel #covid19 #coronavirus #pandemic #uk #usa #eu #vaccinations #vaccine #covidvaccine #reopening

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

Binance is to cut drastically the risk clients can assume in one of its flagship cryptocurrency products after a backlash from regulators and consumers over high-risk derivatives that can quickly leave users with painful losses.⁠ ⁠ The crypto exchange, which facilitates hundreds of billions of dollars worth of trades a month, said it would reduce the maximum leverage — the amount investors can borrow to magnify their bets — on its futures contracts to 20 times from a previous peak of 125 times. ⁠ ⁠ Crypto mogul Changpeng Zhao, who runs Binance, said the cuts were 'in the interest of consumer protections' and would be applied over the 'next few weeks'.⁠ ⁠ Binance’s futures contracts are some of the most actively traded products in the trillion-dollar market for crypto derivatives. The platform, like several of its competitors, allows traders to make huge gains based on small cash stakes. But consumers’ capital can be wiped out by a minor jolt to hyper-volatile crypto markets.⁠ ⁠ 'It’s just plain wrong that a lot of these unregulated crypto platforms have been giving retail investors so much rope to hang themselves,' said Stephen Kelso, head of markets at brokerage ITI Capital. He said cutting leverage was an 'inevitable response to popular outrage at taking advantage of retail clients'.⁠ ⁠ Tap on the link in the bio to read the full story.⁠ ⁠ #financialtimes #ft #crypto #binance #bitcoin

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

The 24-year-old American gymnast has accused authorities of trying to level the Olympic competition by downgrading her scores. During a training session in Tokyo, Biles completed the 'Yurchenko double pike' on the vault apparatus, a somersault that no other female gymnast has attempted in competition. The International Gymnastics Federation has said that it sometimes marks down particularly dangerous feats. Asked why she still planned to perform the move in Tokyo, Biles replied: 'Because I can.' Tap the link in the bio to read more. 📸 Loic Venance/AFP via Getty Images. #FT #financialtimes #simonebiles #olympics #olympics2021 #tokyo2020 #tokyoolympics #gymnastics

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

How is Netflix planning on retaining its fans? By turning its shows into video games.⁠ ⁠ For years, Netflix has watched as the world’s largest technology companies try to position themselves as the ‘Netflix of gaming’ — and agonised about whether to join them. ⁠ ⁠ Google, Amazon, Microsoft and Sony have all rolled out video game streaming services that use sophisticated cloud technology to bring console-quality video games to any device, just like watching a Netflix show. ⁠ ⁠ After years of heady growth, sign-ups in North America have ground to a halt in the past six months. From April to June, 430,000 people cancelled their Netflix subscriptions in the US and Canada. Over that same period, HBO Max added 2.4m subscribers, albeit from a much smaller base, while some believe Netflix is reaching saturation point in its largest markets.⁠ ⁠ ‘We talked about video games for several years, writing up the pros and cons of the timing of entry,’ Reed Hastings, Netflix’s chief executive, said this week. ⁠ ⁠ But rather than taking advantage of its streaming technology to go into competition with Google’s Stadia or Microsoft’s xCloud, Netflix’s strategy more closely resembles earlier efforts by Hollywood studios such as Walt Disney and Warner Bros to develop games based on franchises such as Batman, Lord of the Rings and Spider-Man. ⁠ ⁠ ‘We are in the business of making these amazing worlds and great storylines and incredible characters’ in its original movies and TV series, Greg Peters, Netflix’s chief product officer, told investors on this week’s earnings call. ‘And we know the fans of those stories want to go deeper.’⁠ Click the link in our bio to read the full story on how Netlfix plans to branch into video games. ⁠ ⁠ #FT #financialtimes #netflix #digitalstreaming #videogames #microsoft #warnerbros #hbo #tv #streaming

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

The FT tells the story of Carlos Ghosn, the superstar chief executive who built the global carmaking alliance between Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi. It is the tale of how a globetrotting industry titan with the world at his fingertips became an international fugitive.

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Financial Times Instagram
financialtimes Instagram

Did you invest in Beanie toys? ⁠ ⁠ No one interested in the history of bubbles will have forgotten the image of two furious divorcees dividing up their Beanie Baby collection on the floor of a Las Vegas courtroom back in 1999, writes Merryn Somerset Webb in her latest opinion piece.⁠ ⁠ But, by 2000 as the dotcom bubble burst and took a lot of peripheral nonsense with it, Beanie Baby prices were in freefall. By 2010 toys that had changed hands for well over $1,000 in 1998 were going for a couple of bucks on eBay.⁠ ⁠ Today however, some vintage Beanies with an error on the label (labels are important to Beanie Baby collectors) might go for $60. One with a rare error could make you $2,000 or more.⁠ ⁠ Stuffed toys do not have a monopoly in the strange things to fight about in the divorce courts. UK lawyers are reporting frantic settlement negotiations involving handbags, watches and bikes — and, of course, cryptocurrencies — as prices of pretty much everything you could consider to be an asset look like they will rise forever. You could argue that these things have value because of their rarity. But rarity in itself has no value — lots of things are rare but not remotely valuable. And very little without an obvious or somewhat forecastable income stream really has intrinsic value at all.⁠ ⁠ The sharp price rises of these quite nice consumer goods aren’t about specialness or rarity. They are just examples of mini-bubbles popping up around the more obvious big bubbles in financial assets — think bonds, equities and property. ⁠ ⁠ There are lots of reasons one might give to justify the boom continuing — more stimulus, fast post-lockdown economic growth, more earnings upgrades. But, there are also lots of ways to imagine it going wrong. ⁠ ⁠ In the long term though, if you pick the least expensive stocks with the most obvious income-producing potential, you are unlikely to regret it, as history shows, says Webb.⁠ ⁠ Click the link in our bio to read more about the future of markets.⁠ ⁠ ✏️: Miss Peach⁠ ⁠ #FT #financialtimes #beaniebaby #markets #marketbubble #invest #interestrate #dotcombubble #consumergoods #commodities

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FAQ - financialtimes Instagram Account Stats

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Answer: financialtimes Instagram account has 2.6M followers.
Answer: Engagement rate of financialtimes Instagram is 0.32%
Answer: Average likes are about 8.1K per post.
Answer: Average comments are about 229.17 per post.
Answer: Official Financial Times username Instagram is @financialtimes