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Carbon Brief Engagement Rate: 2.44%

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

🔎 Ahead of the COP26 climate summit starting in Glasgow this weekend, Carbon Brief has analysed the participant lists from every COP since 1995. The analysis revealed that Brazil tends to bring the largest delegation, Morocco once brought a named delegation of almost 1,600 people, and Libya’s delegation is, on average, 99% male. The number of participants at COP has generally increased over the 26 conferences to date. The average total attendance across the first 10 COPs (including both meetings of the two-part COP6) is around 5,000. In contrast, the average across the last five COPs is almost 22,000 participants. Peaks in COP attendance can be seen for COP21 (30,372) in Paris and COP15 in Copenhagen (27,301). The build up to both of these summits came with expectations of formally agreeing a replacement for the Kyoto Protocol. While COP15 fell short with the “weak” Copenhagen Accord, COP21 saw the successful acceptance of the Paris Agreement – the final details for which will continue to be negotiated at COP26 next week. 📲 Link in bio #climatechange #cop #cop26 #glasgow #parisagreement

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

🌍 The term “climate justice” captures the various ways in which global warming impacts people differently and the approaches that can be taken to address this problem “fairly”. Climate-justice language has been used to describe everything from retrofitting the UK’s poorly insulated homes to supporting cyclone-struck communities in Mozambique. As part of a week-long series on climate justice, Carbon Brief has asked a range of scientists, policy experts and campaigners from around the world what the term means to them and why they think it is important. 📲 Follow link in bio for our full week of content, including an in-depth ‘climate justice’ Q&A and exclusive analysis of which countries are historically responsible for climate change. 📷 Photo: Allison Bailey / Alamy Stock Photo. Reuters / Alamy Stock Photo. Reuters / Alamy Stock Photo. #climatechange #climatejustice #historicalemissions #emissions #globalwarming #cop #ParisAgreement #mitigation #adaptation

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

🏭 Fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions have been skewed over the course of history towards a small number of relatively wealthy nations. The first graph shows that "high-income" countries (blue) are responsible for 44% of cumulative CO2 emissions from fossil fuels, land use and forestry since pre-industrial times – although they are home to just 14% of the global population today. A key demand of the “climate justice” movement is for rich countries to recognise their historical responsibility for emissions and to cut emissions in line with the Paris Agreement Additionally, in 2009, industrialised countries agreed to raise $100bn per year by 2020 to support climate action in poorer nations. The second chart shows the most recent available climate finance figures from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). While the figure for 2020 is not yet included, an independent analysis for the UN from the end of 2020 concluded that “the only realistic scenarios are those in which the $100bn target is not reached this year”. However, many have since pointed out that $100bn does not match the true needs of the south. Dr Keston Perry, a political economist and assistant professor of Africana studies at Williams College, tells Carbon Brief that the $100bn target was agreed in the context of “uneven power dynamics at the UN”: “It’s not really a scientific amount, it came about as a result of negotiations in which the industrialised countries are really pulling the strings.” 📲 Link in bio #climatechange #climatejustice #emissions #cop #co2 #climatefinance #cop26

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

📊 In this animation, Carbon Brief looks at national responsibility for historical CO2 emissions from 1850-2021. In total, humans have pumped around 2,500bn tonnes of CO2 (GtCO2) into the atmosphere since 1850, leaving less than 500GtCO2 of remaining carbon budget to stay below 1.5C of warming. This means that, by the end of 2021, the world will collectively have burned through 86% of the carbon budget for a 50-50 probability of staying below 1.5C, or 89% of the budget for a two-thirds likelihood. In first place on the rankings, the US has released more than 509GtCO2 since 1850 and is responsible for the largest share of historical emissions, Carbon Brief analysis shows, with some 20% of the global total. China is a relatively distant second, with 11%, followed by Russia (7%), Brazil (5%) and Indonesia (4%). The latter pair are among the top 10 largest historical emitters, due to CO2 from their land. Meanwhile, large post-colonial European nations, such as Germany and the UK, account for 4% and 3% of the global total, respectively, not including overseas emissions under colonial rule. The analysis - for the first time - includes all sources of CO2, including emissions from land-use change and deforestation. 📲 Link in bio #climatechange #climatejustice #historicalemissions #emissions #cop

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

🌳 Tropical forests on the slopes of Africa’s mountains are more concentrated stores of carbon than the Amazon, a study in Nature suggests. The research on these “montane” forests was carried out by more than a hundred scientists and shows that their carbon stocks are about two-thirds higher than estimates used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The study also shows that these African “cloud” forests are being felled at a higher rate than previously thought, with more than 0.8m hectares lost since the turn of the century. If current levels of deforestation continue, the authors estimate that another half a million hectares – an area roughly twice the size of Luxembourg – could be lost by 2030. “We were quite surprised. We expected [their carbon stocks] to be higher than the literature, but not as high as we found,” study lead author Dr Aida Cuni-Sanchez tells Carbon Brief. She adds: “There’s not a lot of these forests left and they never get a lot of attention.” 📷 Rob Fenenga / Alamy Stock Photo 📲 Link in bio

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

UK coal use (black) has fallen by 86% since 2012, while renewables (light pink and orange) have more than doubled 📈. Despite this, the UK 🇬🇧 still has a long way to go to reach its target of “net-zero” emissions by 2050. More than three quarters of the UK’s energy still comes from fossil fuels 🔥, with oil (green and blue) in the lead, followed closely by natural gas (purple). Data: Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy.

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

The authors of the IPCC’s latest report on the “physical science basis” for climate change conclude that it is “unequivocal” that humans have warmed the planet, causing “widespread and rapid” changes to Earth’s oceans, ice and land surface. They warn that the present state of many parts of the climate system is “unprecedented over many centuries to many thousands of years”. Many of these changes – particularly to the oceans, ice sheets and global sea levels – are “irreversible”, the authors say. Abrupt changes and “tipping points” – such as rapid Antarctic ice sheet melt and forest dieback – “cannot be ruled out”. One of the key developments since the IPCC’s last assessment report in 2013-14 is the strengthening of the links between human-caused warming and increasingly severe extreme weather, the authors say. This is now “an established fact”, they write. In almost all emissions scenarios, global warming is expected to hit 1.5C “in the early 2030s”, the report says. And without reaching “net-zero” CO2 emissions – along with “strong reductions” in other greenhouse gases – the climate system will continue to warm.  📲 Follow the link in bio for Carbon Brief’s in-depth Q&A, explaining the key findings from the report and the advances and developments since the IPCC's last assessment. #climatechange #globalwarming #IPCC #climatereport #COP26

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

“Record-shattering” extremes – which break weather records by large margins – will become more likely as a result of climate change, a new study finds. The paper, published in Nature Climate Change, finds that the northern mid-latitudes are particularly vulnerable to record-shattering heat. This is exemplified by the recent heatwave over north-western US and Canada, in which many long-standing temperature records were broken by as much as 5C. The study finds that record-shattering extreme events are likely to occur more frequently in the coming decades, but notes that they would be “nearly impossible” without climate change. It adds that the speed of warming is more important than the level of warming reached when determining the likelihood of these extremes.  The lead author tells Carbon Brief that “extremes in a changing climate [are] like an athlete on steroids – who suddenly breaks previous records in a step-change manner”. “I think it is an extremely important paper that couldn’t be more timely”, a scientist who was not involved in the research tells Carbon Brief. She adds that, after the heatwave in the Pacific north-west, “many people have suggested our climate models are not able to simulate such events”. However, “this paper shows very nicely that they do. We just haven’t asked the question in quite this way before.” 📷 Photo: Arto Marttinen 📲 Link in bio #climatechange #parisagreement #globalwarming #extremeweather #heatwave #heat #cop26

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

Under its commitments to the Paris Agreement, the UK has pledged to reduce emissions from 1990 levels by 68% by 2030. The government has also set a legally binding target to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.  The UK’s Climate Change Committee (CCC) has estimated that just over 20% of agricultural land must be rewilded or converted to bioenergy or other, non-agricultural crops in order to meet its target of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Nature-based solutions, such as peatland restoration and afforestation, are expected to play a major role in many countries’ and companies’ net-zero targets, but many of these require the repurposing of agricultural land. As well as repurposing land, reducing meat consumption would also help alleviate the strain on land resources in England, the National Food Strategy (NFS) finds. The NFS states: “Globally, the biggest potential carbon benefit of eating less meat would not actually be the reduction in emissions, but the opportunity to repurpose land so that it sequesters carbon.” Research suggests that the food system is responsible for about one-third of global greenhouse gas emissions.  📷 Source: The National Food Strategy, Part II 📲 Link in bio #climatechange #parisagreement #globalwarming #foodsystems #naturebasedsolutions #landuse #rewilding #netzero #dataviz

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

The difference between 1.5C, 2C or 3-4C average global warming may sound marginal. In fact, they represent vastly different scenarios for the future of humanity. The frequency of disasters, the survival of plants and animals, the spread of diseases, the stability of our global climate system - and ultimately the possibility for humanity to survive on this planet - hinge on just a few degrees. Today, we still have the chance to meet the 1.5C goal mentioned in the Paris Agreement. We can still protect ourselves from the worst climate impacts and begin to shape a healthier future. But we are rapidly approaching irreversible climate tipping points. Data from Carbon Brief's interactive "The impacts of climate change at 1.5C, 2C and beyond". Read the article by following the link in our bio. 📷 @unclimatechange #climatechange #parisagreement #biodiversity #globalwarming #tippingpoints

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

Electric vehicles (EVs) are an important part of meeting global goals on climate change. They feature prominently in mitigation pathways that limit warming to well-below 2C or 1.5C, which would be inline with the Paris Agreement’s targets. However, while no greenhouse gas emissions directly come from EVs, they run on electricity that is, in large part, still produced from fossil fuels in many parts of the world. Energy is also used to manufacture the vehicle – and, in particular, the battery. Looking at the lifetime emissions of a new Nissan Leaf EV, shows that while the battery causes higher emissions during vehicle manufacture in “year zero”, this excess carbon debt would be paid back after less than two years of driving. In the UK in 2019, the lifetime emissions per kilometre of driving a Nissan Leaf EV were about three times lower than for the average conventional car, even before accounting for the falling carbon intensity of electricity generation during the car’s lifetime. In countries with coal-intensive electricity generation, the benefits of EVs are smaller and they can have similar lifetime emissions to the most efficient conventional vehicles – such as hybrid-electric models. However, as countries decarbonise electricity generation to meet their climate targets, emissions from driving will fall for existing EVs, and manufacturing emissions will fall for new EVs. 📲 Link in bio #climatechange #electricvehicles #EV #environment #ParisAgreement #cop26

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Carbon Brief Instagram
carbonbrief Instagram

Efforts to manage climate risks in the UK have been “underfunded and ignored” leaving the nation vulnerable to rising temperatures, according to the Climate Change Committee (CCC). Global warming is already having far-reaching impacts as heatwaves and floods increase in scale and frequency. These are set to worsen, the CCC says, even if emissions are cut dramatically. This makes adapting to climate change essential, but, according to the government’s official climate advisers, ministers have failed to grasp the importance of measures such as heat-resilient homes. Not only could adequate adaptation save lives and money, the committee says, it would ensure a resilient electrical grid and healthy forests capable of sucking up carbon dioxide, both of which are essential to achieve the UK’s legally binding goal of net-zero emissions by 2050. Due to this, the net-zero goal “will fail” unless the government urgently boosts the nation’s climate resilience, according to the CCC. In the committee’s new climate “risk assessment”, it outlines a widening gap between the climate risks facing the UK and the government’s plans to shield people from them. It also lays out eight key priority areas to address this “adaptation deficit”. 📲 Link in bio 📸 Photo: Sandra Barber / Alamy Stock Photo. #climatechange #globalwarming #CCC #environment #adaptation #mitigation #netzero

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FAQ - carbonbrief Instagram Account Stats

Here are some of the frequently asked questions about Carbon Brief Instagram Account.

Answer: carbonbrief Instagram account has 21.1K followers.
Answer: Engagement rate of carbonbrief Instagram is 2.44%
Answer: Average likes are about 460 per post.
Answer: Average comments are about 6.67 per post.
Answer: Official Carbon Brief username Instagram is @carbonbrief